Blog Traffic and Engagement: The Power of Search Engines

We’ve made some progress with SEO (search engine optimization) lately. Today I’ll discuss our recent improvement in search engine referrals using Jeremy’s Is Batman A Marvel Character Trapped in the DC Universe? and Diana’s Penny Dreadful Séance Review as examples.

I know very little about optimizing posts to get searches. It isn’t something I even thought about until a few weeks ago. I had a private conversation in March with CompGeekDavid about blog traffic which made me think this blog, in particular, should be getting more search traffic than is. That prompted me to do what I always do when I encounter a problem like this. I started asking questions, looking at stats, and reading stuff.

Jeremy and Diana both get more search engine referrals than me, and they have from the beginning. That’s to be expected. They write a ton of posts about comics, books, movies, and television. That stuff is called “popular culture” for a reason. For the last little while, all my blogging has been oriented toward social media, inequality, photos, music videos, and speaking directly to blogging buddies. I do blog about Tolkien at Part Time Monster, but that’s a pretty narrow niche, and it only trends when new movies are released. What I write just isn’t as popular, search-wise, as Batman and Penny Dreadful.

That said, I don’t think any of us were getting as many search referrals a month ago as we should have been getting. We’re still not, but we have improved our search traffic here in the last few weeks. Two months ago, we were getting fewer than 10 search engine hits a day on most days. Now, on most days we’re getting 50 or more. Both Jeremy and Diana have played important roles in that.

Early in the Penny Dreadful series, I read an article which led me to believe that search crawlers weight headlines and first paragraphs very heavily. Based on that information, I advised Diana to use the series and episode tiles in the headline along with the word “Review.” I also suggested that she include as many of these items as possible in her first three or four sentences:

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