An Unavoidably Political Post, and Don’t Forget about Feminist Friday!

First things first. Diana will have the Feminist Friday post at Part Time Monster this week. We took last weekend off, so we’re hoping for a good discussion this week.

I haven’t been around on the social media this week very much because I’ve been doing a lot of writing.  I briefed a Supreme Court case that deals with religious liberties and contraception yesterday. I added my opinion at the end. That didn’t get a lot of looks, and it’s not surprising. You can only expect so much out of a legal brief on a pop culture blog, and when that legal brief mentions both religion and politics, well. You know. The number of views doesn’t matter, though. A few people read it. It was something that had to be written and had to be published, by me, this week.

I followed up with a discussion of the consequences of the decision and further developments today. That one did better, and that makes sense, too, because it’s newsy. Newsy posts always do better than legal analysis unless your audience happens to be full of attorneys. Sadly, comments on that post were accidentally disabled all day. So I have no idea whether anyone wanted to comment or not. Comments are enabled now, though.

Even though those aren’t the two most popular posts I’ve ever written, I’m glad I published them, and here’s why. They helped me connect some dots. As many of you know, I’ve been writing about the need for LGBTQ people to have full equality in the U.S. roughly every two weeks now for about 4 months. I’ve also started, with the help of many friends, a Feminist Friday discussion which has been hosted on several blogs and has managed to survive for 13 weeks or so. Both of those issues are issues of inequality. I’ve been trying to find a way to connect them in a way that isn’t forced and doesn’t offend anyone who’s actually with me on the issues. I’ve had a bit of a personal breakthrough on that.

I’ve identified cultural, political, and legal mechanisms that allow people to discriminate against all the groups encompassed by “LGBTQ” and “women.” Even if I haven’t spoken clearly enough for anyone else to see them yet, they exist, and I see them.

Breakthrough.

We now return to our regularly scheduled programming.

 

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Weekly preview, with Music

Kris Kristofferson at Austin City Limits in 2009:

Preview:

  • We’ll have posts from Diana (True Blood), Jeremy (Batman), and CompGeekDavid (Music) here and the usual features at Just Gene’O.
  • We’re a go for a Feminist Friday discussion at Part Time Monster this week; we’re still working on the topic.
  • I’m not sure about the Tolkien post for this week or the Follow Friday on the blog yet. I’ll explain briefly why I am not sure below.

WARNING: Politics after the jump.

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Correction and Clarification #SB2681

I try to be accurate, even when I’m in a hurry and trying to stir up political outrage with a blog. Here are some facts about the SB2681 situation as I understand them. I’ve used quite a bit of fuzzy language and gotten one big thing wrong in writing about this. I apologize for my errors; they were honest mistakes. Since we’ve gone from simply reacting to a bill to discussing long-term implications and electoral politics, clarity is an even higher priority to me NOSBfrom here on out than it is on a normal day.

First, the big one. I’ve been referring to non-discrimination resolutions passed by the Oxford, Hattiesburg, and Starkville city councils as “ordinances,” which carries the assumption that they provide some protection. These resolutions do not, in fact, provide any legal protection. They are symbolic, and they are still important because they are a step toward municipal governments providing protection. I still believe that SB2681 is in part an effort to preempt local governments from passing actual ordinances.

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Rankin County, Mississippi recognizes same sex marriage

Well, sort of. This is pure awesome.

Chrissy and Anna paid $12 to record their marriage license as a public document in their hometown of Brandon, Mississippi at the Chancery Clerk’s Office!

If you don’t know how Mississippi’s county courts work, marriage licenses have to be filed with the Circuit Clerk for the marriage to be legally recognized. The Chancery Clerk handles property transfers, among other things. Our friends at Deep South Progressive have the full story.

This is an good symbolic move, but there could be  more to it than that. I’m not an attorney, so take the rest of this with a grain of salt, but here is what I’m thinking.

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