Weekend Music: Everybody Wants to Rule the World (and announcements)

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I know I’ve shared this here before, but I’m playing the world domination thing for laughs this week, and I’ve heard lots of people like the Hunger Games ūüėČ
Things you need to know:
  • I am on vacation next week with the family. I’ll be keeping tabs, but only around if something comes up or someone really needs to chat, and only responding in the evenings. Contributors’ posts will go as normal, and we may even have a surprise thrown into the mix.
  • I’ve done a little mini promotion for Suze81’s #SundayBlogShare this week. If you plan to share links on Sunday, you need to give Suzie’s post a read. I’m using a couple of Follow Fridays today to give people an easy way to spread the word. If you’d like to join in, I have a post for you at Just Gene’O, and if it’s not your thing, no worries.
  • I’ve got drafts piled up around my ears, but nothing that can’t wait and nothing that won’t be much improved if I work on them a little more. My Saturday Coffee post at Just Gene’O will be my last personal post until I get back unless something comes up that can’t wait.
  • Photoblogging is not going away. I’m just a little short on time to do the loading-and-publishing part of the blogging right now. If you’re following for the photos, stick with us. They’ll be back.
Have a great weekend, all!

Top Ten Tuesday: Top Ten Books on My Fall Reading List

Each week, the good folks at The Broke and the Bookish host a meme post they call Top Ten Tuesday. They provide topics well in advance and even have a way to share your links with other Top Ten Tuesday bloggers. I love these posts, and I haven’t written anything substantial here in awhile, so this seems a good week to jump back into the TTT game. Enjoy!

1. The Benevolence Archives vol. 1 by Luther M. Siler

This is a collection of novella-length science fiction stories that I intended to read this summer. The author is the delightfully demented genius behind the blog Infinite Free Time, and everyone I’ve talked to who’s read this book so far has thoroughly enjoyed it, so it’s at the top of my list.

2. Storm Front by Jim Butcherdresden wallpaper

The first novel in the Dresden Files series. While I need to commit to another fantasy series even less than I need to try and follow one more t.v. series, the premise intrigues me. This one’s been on my tbr list for awhile, and I’m thinking I might actually pick it up this fall.

3. The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins

I feel as though this one is a matter of cultural literacy at this point. I’m tired of reading Hunger Games posts and having to say “um well, since I haven’t read it I hesitate to say too much about it but . . .”

4. Lamb by Christopher Moore

Diana loaned this one to me over the summer, and I’ve not gotten around to it yet.

5. The Collector by John Fowles

I’ve been wanting to read this one for years, but I always forget about it when I go for library books. I saw a friend of mine reading it for a course a couple of weeks ago and made a mental note¬†to put it on the list.

6. Batman: The Killing Joke by Alan Moore, Ill. By Brian Bolland

the-killing-joke-deluxe-front-cover1This is the most influential Batman story I’ve never read. Judging from the conversations I had over the summer on some of Jeremy’s Batman threads and at CompGeeks, I really need to get on this one. Fortunately, Jeremy loaned me a copy yesterday, and it’s a quick read.

7. One of our Thursdays is Missing by Jasper Fforde

I binged on Fforde’s Thursday Next series a couple of summers ago, and this is where I left off. I’m hoping to get caught up on the series this fall.

8. Interworld by Neil Gaiman and Michael Reaves

I discovered this one by googling a list of Gaiman’s books and browsing the titles I’ve not read until I found the one I like most.

9. The Wind Through the Keyhole by Stephen King

To my knowledge, this is the only piece of King’s Dark Tower lore I haven’t read. I wasn’t even aware of its existence until yesterday, and the blurb is quite intriguing.

10. To the Finland Station: A Study in the Writing and Acting of History by Edmund Wilson

Since no reading list of mine can be complete without at least one serious piece of nonfiction, and I’ve been putting this one off for 20 years.

Our top 5 Posts Ever

I’ve never done one of these, but I’ve seen them around. Taylor Grace does them regularly; you can find her latest one here. Typically, it’s something I’d look at monthly or quarterly, but since this is the first one, let’s look at the top five Part Time Monster/Sourcerer posts from the past eight months. These are in order, based on post views, starting from the top.

1. On Teaching Our Children: White Privilege, Ageism, and Maintaining an Open Dialogue

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This one was Freshly Pressed, and deservedly so. Nothing else touches it. Only a couple of the other posts on this list have even half the views this one has. It’s Diana’s, published¬†at the Monster.

2. Finnick ODair: The Hooker/Gladiator with A Heart of Gold and Feminine Masculinity.

Another of Diana’s. I have no idea where all the views came from. I wasn’t paying that much attention to referrals and such at the time. She timed it perfectly to¬†catch a Hunger Games trend if I recall correctly, though.

3. Is Batman a Marvel Character Trapped in the DC Universe?

This one is Jeremy’s. It’s Sourcerer’s most popular post ever because it gets search engine hits every single day. Sometimes 15 or more. We got lucky with the headline, the choice of media, a reblog, and a Stumble. It’s a top ten Google search for “Is Batman Marvel?” And apparently it answers the question in a way that makes people curious. I believe this video of Batman and Superman fighting has a lot to do with its success.

4. Snowmageddon 2014: A Report In Memes

Another of Diana’s. She’s just good at appealing to people, apparently. This was a spur of the moment post that turned into a perfect Facebook share at a time when the entire southeastern U.S. was snowed in, but most of us had power. We actively tagged our¬†friend with it and got so many Facebook looks that it attracted search traffic for weeks afterward. It’s also one of my favorite posts we’ve written so far.

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5. Penny Dreadful Seance Review.

Diana, again, at Sourcerer this time. This one is also on the list because of search traffic. Diana and I had chat at the beginning of the Penny Dreadful season and compared notes about search engine optimization. She wrote a review every week for the the whole Penny Dreadful season and tailored her posts to be searchable. It worked, and this one turned out to be the most popular of her reviews.

A few further notes:

  1. PTM’s about page, Meet the Monster, is the only page we have that’s as popular as these five posts. If I’d included pages in this list, it would be #2.
  2. The Seance review is actually tied for #5 with a post I wrote about the Phil Robertson dustup, as of this writing. I didn’t include my post because all the views I got from it came from Facebook within a few days of me writing it. The Seance review is the clear winner because it’s attracting people from searches, and I expect it to pull ahead by at least one view any minute now.
  3. My most popular post at Just Gene’O is currently sitting at about a quarter of the views that the Seance Review, #5 on the list, has.

I love posts like this. I find them helpful as a blogger and interesting as a reader. I’ll try and do them periodically.