Mid-Week Update and Feminist Friday Thoughts

First of all, thanks to regular contributors @quaintjeremy and @hohmeisw for keeping Sourcerer so well-supplied with posts lately. If it weren’t for you guys, there’s no way I would have made it to the halfway point of the A to Z Challenge with The Writing Catalog. I’ve discovered lots of good blogs through A to Z, and you can find many of them on my April A to Z page.

I need to take a break from the Feminist Friday discussions this week. I think the next thing that I, personally need to write about is either improving sex education or defining education itself for future discussion. Both of those are problematic topics that require a lot of thought and careful use of language. I don’t want to rush a post on either one just to have it for Friday, and I may be too tied up with work to moderate that discussion adequately.

If anyone else wants to write a Feminist Friday post, I’ll be happy read it and consider it for a reblog it or a link with a short response, and equally happy to participate in a discussion on your thread. I do plan to keep these discussions going, and I encourage everyone who’s been participating to keep finding ways to talk about gender inequality.

I’ve finally set up a series of structured Twitter lists. I haven’t added people to them yet because I need to make sure they’re right before I start adding people; but if you follow me on Twitter, I’ll be adding you to a list or two over the next month so that I can keep up with you more easily.

My priority for the next couple of weeks is to get the A to Z Challenge finished up; once I do that, you’ll see more posting from me here and at the Monster. In the meantime, we’ll have plenty from Jeremy and Will, and I’ll be around on the discussion threads, as always.

Top 10 Marvel Characters, part 2

by Jeremy DeFatta

Good day, everyone! Today, I want to finish laying out my top ten favorite Marvel Comics characters. Here are numbers 6-10.

6. Wolverine – He’s the best there is at what he does and the man who just won’t die. For the longest time, he was as WolverineThumbmysterious as the Joker, and a lot of fans were upset when writers gave him a concrete origin. I’ve found that knowing Logan’s true background, and that his real name is James Howlett, in no way diminish how I enjoy the character.

He’s powerful in ways other superheroes are not, and he never backs down from a fight. There’s more to him than the violence, too; he can also be a tender caretaker to fellow outcasts. If I had to offer up a couple of recent stories/series that really show off the strengths of the character, I would recommend Mark Millar’s Old Man Logan and Rick Remender’s Uncanny X-Force.

7. Cable – He’s one of those corny 90s characters that has gotten better with age. He’s a damaged soldier from the future who comes back in time to try to prevent the hellish events that eventually destroy his world. Sadly, very few people listen to him after he helps the X-Men defeat Apocalypse. As the (possible) future son of Jean Grey and Scott Summers (Cyclops), Cable (or Nathan Grey) has some of the greatest power potential of any mutant in the Marvel Universe. It is appropriate that people began to see him as a sort of Christ-figure in Cable & Deadpool from last decade, one of several series I talk about in some detail in my Top Marvel Stories Since 2000 post.

8. Rogue – I’m beginning to see that this half of the list is a bit mutant-heavy, which is interesting given the fact that I’m RogueThumbnot a huge fan of the state of the X-books at Marvel currently. Anyway, Rogue is one of my favorite characters in Marvel for several reasons—she’s my favorite of Wolverine’s “little sister” characters, she’s one of the few unashamed Southern superheroes, I grew up watching her on the old X-Men cartoon, and I’ve been into comics long enough to have watched her grow a great deal as a character. To get a better view of her in recent years, I recommend Mike Carey’s run on X-Men: Legacy and Rick Remender’s current run on Uncanny Avengers.

9. Age of Apocalypse Sabretooth, Spider-Man 2099, Morph and other Exiles characters – This one is a bit of a cheat, pulling in an entire group of characters. Exiles was a work of genius: plumb Marvel’s endless multiverse for alternate timeline versions of known characters (and many unknown characters), build a team out of them, and send them on missions to repair damaged timelines with the promise they can one day go home, Quantum Leap-style.

By using nothing but new and side characters from and in alternate universes, the writers of Exiles were free to shrug off the restraints of continuity and tell whatever stories they pleased. Unlike in most mainstream comic stories, the characters in Exiles could and sometimes did die on missions. I still have difficulty articulating the feelings I experienced throughout this series. Definitely check it out if you ever get the chance. Check out my most recent comics news roundup for pleasing information on Spider-Man 2099’s next adventure.

DoomCover

10. Victor von Doom – What’s a list of heroes without a villain? Dr. Doom is my choice. Doom can be cruel, but he is an honorable man, and this extends to many different versions of the character. I would argue that, deep down, he is a truly good person, but his arrogance and sense of noblesse oblige get in the way of him ever being purely heroic. Check out Mark Millar’s run on Ultimate Fantastic Four and Jonathan Hickman’s run on the original Fantastic Four to see what I mean.

And that wraps up my list. Thank you all for reading both parts. What do you think of this half? Who do you feel I’ve left off? Let me know your thoughts below. Don’t forget to support your local comic shops. Tweet me @quaintjeremy.

Images: Wolverine from the The New Avengers #5 cover (March 2005) by David Finch, via Wikipedia. Rogue cover image from Rogue #2 (February 1995) by Mike Wieringo and Terry Austin, via Wikipedia. Doctor Doom: Fantastic Four #247 (Oct. 1982) cover by John Byrne via Wikipedia.

All Marvel characters and the distinctive likeness(es) thereof are Trademarks & Copyright © 1996 Marvel Characters, Inc. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.